Quick Answer: How Deep Have We Drilled Into The Earth?

What layer of the Earth have humans drilled into?

mantleHumans have been to the moon and explored almost every corner of the planet – but there’s one place they have never been.

An international group of scientists say they plan to be the first group to drill successfully into the Earth’s mantle, the planet’s interior, which lies just beneath the outer crust..

Has anyone ever dug into mantle?

This is the Kola Superdeep Borehole, the deepest manmade hole on Earth and deepest artificial point on Earth. … The Soviets’ superdeep borehole isn’t alone. During the Cold War, there was a race by the superpowers to drill as deep as possible into the Earth’s crust – and even to reach the mantle of the planet itself.

What was found in the deepest man made hole?

Boreholes were drilled by branching from a central hole. The deepest, SG-3, reached 12,262 metres (40,230 ft; 7.619 mi) in 1989 and is the deepest artificial point on Earth….Kola Superdeep Borehole.LocationTypeScientific boreholeGreatest depth12,262 metres (40,230 ft; 7.619 mi)HistoryOpened19658 more rows

What was found in the Kola Superdeep borehole?

The Kola Superdeep Borehole was just 9 inches in diameter, but at 40,230 feet (12,262 meters) reigns as the deepest hole. It took almost 20 years to reach that 7.5-mile depth—only half the distance or less to the mantle. Among the more interesting discoveries: microscopic plankton fossils found at four miles down.

Can we drill into Earth’s core?

It’s the thinnest of three main layers, yet humans have never drilled all the way through it. Then, the mantle makes up a whopping 84% of the planet’s volume. At the inner core, you’d have to drill through solid iron. This would be especially difficult because there’s near-zero gravity at the core.

Why did they dig the Kola Superdeep borehole?

The primary reason for the Kola Superdeep Borehole was one of pure scientific intrigue. The team wanted to see if they could find anything interesting about the nature of the Earth’s crust. By the time the team hit serious technical challenges, the project was closed down and deemed a great success.